Short Term Causes of WW2

In our history class we are studying the short  term causes of WW2, which were: Rearmament, Rhineland, Anschluss, Czechoslovakia and the Nazi Soviet Pact. Our teacher told us to prepeare presentations in groups about one topic. I worked on Czechoslovakia with Santiago Blasco, Benjamin Mayol, Rosario Segura and Sybilla Correa Perkins.

Rearmament:

 

Rhineland:

Anschluss:

 

Czechoslovakia:

 

Nazi Soviet Pact:

 

Nazi Germany

On History class, we are studying the topic of Nazi Germany. Our assignment consisted on spliting in groups and making presentations about the subdivision of topic each group was asigned. I was part in two different groups: in the first one, Margarita Muller, Ines Galmarini and me had to prepare the presentation about the Persecution of Minorities. We used the tool powtoon and we included information from our history books and the one from Margui’s sister to present this topic. We also added a diary entry, two videos and one quote to expand it a bit more. Meanwhile, in the second group I was part of, Lola Villegas Argento, Maria Roggero and me were assigned to prepare the pressentation about  Opposition towards the Nazi party. We did 3 diary entries explaining the three most important reasons about why there was so little opposition in Germany. I hope you like both presentations!

 

  • OPPOSITION:

Presentation

 

  • THE PERSECUTION OF MINORITIES:

Presentation

Kristallnacht: Night Of Broken Glass

Quote:

The day after Kristallnacht the teacher said:

” Don’t worry about what you see, even if you see some natsy things which you may not understand. Hitler wants a better Germany, a clean Germany. Don’t worry, evrything will work out fine in the end.”

Nazi Treatment of Gypsies

 

 

  • MARTIN’S PRESENTATION REVIEW:

After we attended all the presentations about Nazi Germany, Jeronimo’s father came to our school to talk about that topic, so that we could learn more about the Nazis and their victims. He explained us: the things the Nazis made in the concentration/death camps, how the people lived in the ghettos, what the Nazis did to take all the Jews away from their camps, the final solution, the difference between Holocaust and Shoah and, of course, other things as well. To explain this, he prepared a presentation with many pictures, which were taken when he went to visit those camps. I really like his presentation because I learned lots of new things that I didn’t know before, which are very important to know now a days. It was a very interesting way to learn new things, because the one who explained this to us was a friend’s father and wasn’t a stranger. I hope we’ll have another presentation like this soon!

 

  • MUSEO DEL HOLOCAUSTO:

On Wednesday 28th , we went to “El Museo del Holocausto”. When we arrived, we saw a man’s testimony who survived from the Auschwitz concentration camp. That man told us his life after the final solution, how he had managed to escape from there, and finally, how he had gone to live to Argentina with his two brothers. He told us some anecdotes, for example; the fact that his main desire was to survive each single day; how his friends and him asked for some extra breads to have enough energy to live that day; how one of his friends helped him when he was almost dying, how he came to Argentina and how terrible he felt to know that he survived and his friends didn’t. Afterwards, the woman showed us the whole museum, which was very interesting as well. I like the museum because it’s very easy to understand. I also like the sources it has, for example, the broken glasses from Kristallnacht, the doll dressed up with the victim’s uniforms and the real camp victim’s uniforms. However, I don’t like it that much because I don’t like the things the Nazis did to innocent people and that make me feel very sad and oppressive.

Lenny told us to take pictures of the museum, and afterwards, make a collage. Here it is mine! I hope this collage help you to understand what the museum is like and my feelings towards this topic. 

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The Abyssinian Crisis – 1936

The next conflict we will focus on now, is the Abyssinian Crisis.

As we did with the Manchurian Crisis, we will work on recorded evidence and in this case, we will be able to listen to witnesses of the event and their impressions on what happened.

Questions:

  • WHAT WAS THE ITALIAN EMPIRE LIKE BY 1930?

The Italian empire was insignificant compared with other powerful empires succh as Britain and France

  • HOW DID SENATOR GIORGIO PISANO EXPLAIN ITALY’S ATTITUDE FOR CONQUEST?

Senator Giorgio Pisano couldn’t understand why they shouldn’t conquer Ethiopia, while England and France were conquering the middle East, India and others places of the world.

  • WHAT IS ABYSSINIA TODAY? WHAT WAS THE SITUATION BY 1930?

Abyssinia today is Ethiopia, by 1930 she was very poor, she was going backwards and she practiced slavery.

  • WHAT EXCUSE DID MUSSOLINI HAVE TO CONQUER ABYSSINIA?

Mussolini’s excuse to conquer Abyssinia was that he needed raw materials and land because of the fact that the population was incrising.

  • WHAT WAS THE ROLE OF FRANCE AND GREAT BRITAIN IN ITALY’S INVASION?

Before beginning his expansion into Ethiopia, Mussolini asked  Britain and France for their permission. On the hand hand, France accepted, but on the other hand, Britain was ambigous.

  • WHAT EVIDENCE DOES MUSSOLINI’S DAUGHTER PROVIDE?

Mussolini’s daughter told everyone that they were going to Ethiopia. She asked McDonald, who was the prime minister at that time, if the English would go to war (that was her main concern). He answered “no”. So she asked if they were going to take any action. And the prime minister respond “ofcourse, but we won’t make war”

  • WHAT DID YOUNG SOLDIERS BELIEVE WAS THEIR DUTY TOWARDS ITALY?

Young soldiers believed their duty was to unificate Italy and to make it greater

  • WHAT WAS CONTROVERSIAL ABOUT THE USE OF POISON GAS BY THE ITALIANS?

Mussolini, seven years before he made a secret treaty improving the use of Poison Gas, had not only renounced to it, but it had also called it uncivilized.

  • WHAT DID THE LEAGUE DECIDE TO DO? HOW EFFECTIVE WERE THOSE MEASURES?

The League decided to impose limited sanctions to Mussolini’s actions, however, those  weren’t military’s. So Italy conquered Abyssinia, so those measures weren’t efective.

  • HOW DID ORDINARY PEOPLE REACTION TO SANCTIONS?

Ordinary people believed the sanctions were unfair and that they were an obstacle for Italy to recover.

The Manchuria Crisis in process

In history we are staring a new topic: the work of the League of Nations in the 1930s. So today we are going to learn about the 1st incident: the Japanesse invation to Manchuria in 1931. Our history teacher, Lenny, gave us a task. We had to see the following video and answer some questions.

Questions:

  1. How does the video open? What might the connection between the League and the opening scenes in Poland be?
  2. What problems did Japan face? (Mention ALL of them)
  3. What was the role of the army in Japan?
  4. What did army leaders believe Japan needed?
  5. What was the value of Manchuria?
  6. What happened at Mudken?
  7. What did the League do about it?
  8. What was Japan’s reaction to the decision of the League?

Answers:

  1. The video is open by saying the reasons of how the League failed during the 1930s: in maintaining peace and avoiding war. It also showed Poland in 1939 and it says that the second world war started. The connection between Poland and the League was that both
  2. The problems that Japan faced were the followings…

Japan had suffered more than most from The Great depression

Japan was an isolated country from trade

Japan did not have natural resources from her own to exploit, and her population was booming

In 1930s unemployment was very high

3. The politicians took second place to the army. The Japanese army controlled the education system. Their main objectives was to expansion there territory. Japanese believed that territory in Asia would benefit their empire.

4. Army leaders believed that Japan needed natural resources

5. Manchuria was mostly barren, but it was rich in natural resources, which Japanese desperately needed for its economy.

6. There was an explosion at Mukden, so Japanese used that conflict as an excuse to invade Manchuria. They invaded Manchuria and not another place because they needed more natural resources and more space for it population. Manchuria was the perfect place to do that.

7.  China appealed to the Leauge, who finally decided that Japan should leave Manchuria and become a semi-independent nation free from China and Japan.

8. Japan leave the League of Nations because she wanted to have Manchuria, and leaving the League meant that nobody would intervene.

 

 

The League of Nations 1920s

In our history class, with our history teacher, Lenny Ambrosini, we are studying the League of Nations at the 1920s. To study it we made some groups. Each group had one different topic, and we presented the topics in class. The presentations were the followings…

The Structure of The League: By Vignesh Manwani, Gonzalo Criniti, Santiago Blasco & Benjamin Mayol.

This thinglink explains the different sections of the League of Nations and it’s purpose.

 

 

Aims & Membership: By Ines Galmarini, Flor Claps & Martina Ibarbia.

This thinglink explains the aims and the members of the League of Nations.

 

 

Achievements: By Jerónimo Leguizamón, María Roggero, Federika Marty & me.

This thinglink explains the achievements of the league which were the refugees, the transport, the health, the working conditions and the social problems.

 

 

Disarmament: By Sybilla Correa Perkins, Rosario Segura & Milagros Mendez

This thinglink explains the disarmament that the League of Nations made and the international agreements that were signed to make a more peaceful world.

 

 

Vilna & The Geneva Protocol: By Silvestre Braun, Lucas Campión & Lola Argento

This thinglink explains two failures of the League, which were, Vilna and the Geneva Protocol.

 

 

Corfu & Bulgaria: Victoria Landolfo, Milagros Montanelli, Margarita Muller & Rosario Vago This thinglink explains one failure (Corfu) and one succed (Bulgaria) of the League of Nations.     Upper Silesia and Aaland Island: Martin Anania, Ignacio Maestro Malek & Fransisco Lusso This thinglink explains the dispute between Germany and Poland over Upper Silesia and the dispute between Finland and Sweden to have the Aaland Islands.

The Paris Peace Conference

Today, in our history class, we watched a video and answer some questions.

 

Questions:

1) War guilt.Explain the arguments FOR and AGAINST this term.

2) Which term followed War Guilt? How much would it be today? What consequences/impact did it have on Germany?

3) Why were the victors planning to prevent a future war with Germany in the Treaty?

4) What territorial losses did Germany have to face? What happened to the German colonies? What did Wilson dislike about this?

5) Which new nations were created after WW1?

Answers:

1)  Germany was responsable…

For war because: It didn’t take long for Germany to declare war on Russia and then on France. Then she invaded Belgium in just a matter of days.

Against war because: There was the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. The terms that Austria-Hungary put on Serbia. The Russians decide to enter war, which gave Germany a pretext to enter war.

2) The term that followed war guilt was reperations.  They had to pay 400 billion 2013 dollars. It humiliated  Germany, future generations that had nothing to do with war, had to pay. But they ended up paying $60 billion 2013 dollars.  It also aaffected it’s economy.

3) The allies didn’t want  future war with Germany because if she had won her points for to declare war would be harder.

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4) From Germany territory was taken, as from colonies to land in the proper country. Poland wss carved out of Germany and Alsace Lorraine was given back to France. As for the colonies, they were distribute between de European Empires. President Wilson didn’t like it because in his 14 points for peace, he said that there should be democracy in Europe and countries should have self determination.

5) The new nations were: Poland, Yugoslavia, Austria,  Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bosnia, Croatia and Slovenia.

Extension work

In groups we wrote a conversation between Clemenceau, Wilson and Lloyd George about what we think their country’s should get as compensation from the war, their views on the 14 Points and the type of punishment Germany should receive. I did it with Lucas Campión.

Process of the dialogue:

 

The Voicethread with the dialogue:

(To listen the hole dialogue you have to press the arrow)

 

The personal comment about this project to learn on the Big Three and their aims and objectives:

We feel we had learnt more than if we had studied this from the book, because this way for studying is more funny. And we remember funny things, so we are going to remeber and learn more about the Big Three by using this technique.

What we personally enjoyed from this project was the part in which we had to record our voices. Because it was very funny to hear our voices in Voicethread.

If the class from Senior 1 next year are going to do this proyect again, we wouldn’t change nothing. Because nothing had to be change. We only recomnd you to speak well before you record it.

The Development of WW1

World War 1 resumed in one video, showed by Fefi Marty an Sil Braun

 

Time line 1914: Federika Marty & Silvestre Braun

(click here)

Time line 1915: Juana Perez Muñiz & Benjamín Mayol

Time line 1916: Gonzalo CrinitiMartina Ibarbia & Lucas Campion

Time line 1917: Victoria Landolfo &

1918:  Lola Villegas Argento and Ignacio Maestro Malek

 

Video of the Christmas truce: This is a song of Paul McCartney that talk about the Christmas truce.

 

 

Trenches: Jerónimos Leguizamon, Ines Galmarini & María Roggero

Misconceptions:

1 y 2

3 y 4

5 y 6

7, 8 y 9

10 y 11